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  • first-rate medical care
  • enrichment activities that encourage natural behaviors

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Save the Chimps Dr. Andrew Halloran Travels to Africa to Save Chimpanzees Living in the Wild

Fort Pierce, FL: Save the Chimps, the world’s largest privately funded sanctuary for retired chimpanzees located in Fort Pierce, Florida announced that its Director of Chimpanzee Care and Behavior, Dr. Andrew Halloran, has traveled to Sierra Leone, Africa on a chimpanzee conservation trip he undertakes annually. The trip is part of a multi-year, international campaign Dr. Halloran has undertaken in an effort to save chimpanzees living in the wild called the Tonkolili Chimpanzee Project, founded in 2012.

As humans and chimpanzees are being forced closer and closer, there exists a war for the remaining natural resources in Africa. Chimps raid farms for food, farmers defend their land. “Unfortunately this is a growing reality for wild chimpanzees and unless we can find more ways of community based conservation, the future for wild chimpanzees is bleak,” stated Dr. Halloran.

Dr Andrew Halloran in Africa

The Tonkolili Chimpanzee Project was started to save several family groups of chimpanzees living in an environment under continual threat of human encroachment. The chimpanzees, who occupy an ever-shrinking forest fragment, have a long standing, albeit, contentious history of interaction with the nearby villages and farms.  “I am there to help find ways of mitigating conflicts between humans and chimpanzees through sustainable economic empowerment,” stated Dr. Halloran. In fact, the Tonkoklili Chimpanzee Project has undertaken some innovative initiatives to give farmers incentives to not retaliate against chimpanzees including providing alternative forms of income via livestock and other sustainable projects.

Dr. Halloran, author of the book Song of the Ape, has documented his time in Sierra Leone in a twelve part serial published in the Earth Island Journal entitled Lion Shaped Mountain (it can be found at www.earthislandjournal.org). – soon to be published in book form by Ingram publishing.  Shedding aside all preconceived notions about what is known about chimpanzee behavior, in Lion Shaped Mountain, Dr. Halloran recounts a remarkable tale of survival, and of extreme adaptation.

dr andrew halloran africa

Dr. Andrew R. Halloran is a primatologist who studies chimpanzee ecology, communication, and behavior. Dr. Halloran is a research affiliate with the Conservation Society of Sierra Leone as well as the founder of the Tonkolili Chimpanzee Project in Central Sierra Leone which seeks to find sustainable solutions to chimpanzee conservation through economic empowerment of local villages.

A Legacy of Caring

Since its founding in 1997 by Primatologist Dr. Carole Noon, the sanctuary has successfully retired 333 chimpanzees from unsuitable living conditions, allowing them to live out their days in a safe, secure, and vibrantly social community alongside their fellow chimpanzees. The retired chimps now live in large family groups on 12 separate three-acre islands, where they receive three fresh meals daily, first rate medical care, and a variety of activities in an enriched environment. For more information or to donate your time or treasure, visit savethechimps.org.

Jennifer Brown Promoted to Director of Human Resources at Save the Chimps

Dr Shelly Lakly and Jennifer Brown

Save the Chimps, the world’s largest privately funded sanctuary for retired chimpanzees, proudly announced the promotion of Jennifer Brown, a Port St Lucie resident, from Manager of Human Resources to Director of Human Resources effective immediately.

In her new role, Ms. Brown will work directly with the new Executive Director of Save the Chimps, Dr. Shelly Lakly on numerous initiatives designed to strengthen the organization and better serve its 61 employees.

“Since she started Jennifer has demonstrated key leadership, bringing Save the Chimps internal processes to a much higher, more efficient level. Her deep commitment to doing what is right, to enhancing the working lives for our employees is unmatched, it is an honor to have her as a key member of our leadership team,” stated Dr. Lakly.

Ms. Brown joined Save the Chimps in April of 2019, having previously served in a variety of Human Resources positions, she has over 15 years of progressively responsible experience. A seasoned professional, Ms. Brown graduated from Kean University in New Jersey with a double major in Communications and English, she then completed her MBA at Fairleigh Dickinson University.

In her short time with the organization, Ms. Brown has overhauled the Human Resources department, streamlining vendors and processes and has instituted a formal training program for department managers. In addition, she has recruited and successfully retained 35 full time employees as well as launching several initiatives including time clock management and employee goal setting.

A Legacy of Caring

Since its founding in 1997 by Primatologist Dr. Carole Noon, the sanctuary has successfully retired 333 chimpanzees from unsuitable living conditions, allowing them to live out their days in a safe, secure, and vibrantly social community alongside their fellow chimpanzees. The retired chimps now live in large family groups on 12 separate three-acre islands, where they receive three fresh meals daily, first rate medical care, and a variety of activities in an enriched environment. For more information or to donate your time or treasure, visit savethechimps.org.

Get to Know Garfield. New Video!

Get to Know Me!

I was born on March 9, 1991 at the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research to my mother Hope and father Eric. Unlike many chimps born in research labs, I was raised by my mother until my third birthday. My close bond with my mother made it especially traumatic for both of us when I was taken from her.

I stayed at Southwest until I was seven years old. Other than notations of annual physicals, there are no records of my time there. In March 1998, I was sent to the Coulston Foundation. In my first year there, I was anesthetized six times for physicals and blood screenings. Fortunately, I was never assigned to a research project.

I am a large and magnificent chimpanzee, if I do say so myself, and very high-ranking and respected in my group. I have lighter skin than most chimps, and a very prominent jaw. I’ve been told that I resemble my father Eric. In 2003, three chimps were born in the Air Force Group, despite the fact that all of the males, including me, had been given vasectomies. It turns out that my vasectomy failed, and genetic testing revealed that I am the biological father of all three babies: Jude, JB and Angie. My son Jude looks like his mother, Gogi, but JB and Angie are the spitting image of me. I was Alpha of my group until my son, JB, became a teenager and took over the role.

I absolutely love being out on my expansive island and sometimes will refuse to come inside for breakfast because I’d rather roam and munch on cattails that surround our island.

We love watching Garfield’s gentle and relaxed side shine through in his older age. Though he still occasionally helps his son, JB, with some of the alpha duties in the group, for the most part Garfield is able to sit back and enjoy his golden years. Still, he is a magnificent, regal, and strong male and is treated with great respect by all in his family.

Help support this handsome and dignified chimp by adopting Garfield today.

Primatologists Gather at Save the Chimps for Annual Conference

Save the Chimps, the world’s largest privately funded sanctuary for retired chimpanzees, recently hosted the 6th Annual South Florida Primatology Meeting at its Sanctuary in Fort Pierce as well as at the Fenn Center at Indian River State College. In attendance were scientists, primatologists, primate care technicians, students and Save the Chimps volunteers. The keynote lecture was presented by David Morgan, co-director of the Goualougo Triangle Ape Project and research fellow of the Lester E. Fisher Center for the Study and Conservation of Apes at Lincoln Park Zoo.

The South Florida Primatology Meeting began in 2014 to build a local network of primatologists, primate care technicians, students, and those interested in the study, care, welfare, and preservation of primates.  “This is a passionate group of professionals, care technicians and students who are all interested in fostering discussion, exploring current research and sharing best practices in primate study and care,” stated Dr. Andrew Halloran, organizer of the conference.  Dr. Halloran is Director of Chimpanzee Behavior and Care at Save the Chimps, research affiliate with the Conservation Society of Sierra Leone as well as the founder of the Tonkolili Chimpanzee Project in Central Sierra Leone which seeks to find sustainable solutions to chimpanzee conservation through economic empowerment of local villages.

The network also aims to create a collegial network of support for those working in primate related fields. In addition to local practitioners and academics, the Executive Director and several staff from Chimp Haven attended the conference—Chimp Haven is the world’s largest publicly funded sanctuary for chimpanzees located outside Shreveport, Louisiana.

Amy Fultz, co-founder of Chimp Haven and its Director of Behavior, Research and Training, participated in a panel discussion on care for captive chimpanzees along with Dr. Tina Cloutier-Barbour Primate Curator at Lion Country Safari, Caroline Griffis of the Pan African Sanctuary Alliance, Save the Chimps Associate Veterinarian Dr. Kelsey McClure and Dr. Valerie Kirk, Save the Chimps Director of Veterinary Care.

“Sharing best practices amongst our sanctuary staff is key to being able to give our resident chimpanzees the best care possible,” added Dr. Shelly Lakly, Executive Director of Save the Chimps. In fact, earlier this winter, the senior staff of Save the Chimps visited Chimp Haven to see their facility and best practices in action. “Getting to share information and practices is invaluable – and the support we can give each other is unparalleled – there’s no one else we can turn to except each other when it comes to caring for large family groups of rescued chimpanzees,” added Dr. Lakly.

Over the years, the annual meeting has been held at Lynn University, Lion Country Safari, Brevard Zoo, Dumond Conservancy / Monkey Jungle – however this the first time it was being held at Save the Chimps. “We are so proud of our care technicians and our staff, and it was a great opportunity to showcase the work we are doing to care for 233 resident chimpanzees,” added Dr. Halloran. The event was supported in part by Summer Crush Winery.

A Legacy of Caring

Since its founding in 1997 by Primatologist Dr. Carole Noon, the sanctuary has successfully retired 333 chimpanzees from unsuitable living conditions, allowing them to live out their days in a safe, secure, and vibrantly social community alongside their fellow chimpanzees. The retired chimps now live in large family groups on 12 separate three-acre islands, where they receive three fresh meals daily, first rate medical care, and a variety of activities in an enriched environment. For more information or to donate your time or treasure, visit savethechimps.org.

6th Annual Primatologist Conference

Tina Cloutier Barbour of Lion Country Safari, Amy Fultz of Chimp Haven, Drs. Valerie Kirk, Kelsey McClure and Andrew Halloran of Save the Chimps discuss captive chimpanzee best practices

February Chimp Birthdays

Who doesn’t love presents?
The chimps do and they  most definitely deserve them!

Visit our wishlist to send goodies for the chimps.
Big pant hoot thank you for your generosity and support! 

Bambi

February 1, 1999

Bambi 2010 (1)

 

Jersey

February 1, 1996

Jersey Nov 2011

Fergus

February 2, 1995

Fergus relaxing in the Florida sunshine

Amy

February 2, 1983

Butch

February 3, 1996

Butch (2) copy

Pamela

February 4, 1999
Pamela (4)

Devon

February 4, 1993

Devon

Dylan

February 5, 2007

Dylan 6.1 x 9.1

Amanda

February 6, 1990

Amanda Feb 2011

Spudnut

February 8, 1996

Spudnut (4)

Alison

February 11, 1970

Alison (2)

Tea

February 12, 2000

Tea 2 copy

Larry

February 14, 1983Larry Apr 2014 (7)

CJ

February 18, 1986

CJ

Allie

February 19,  1998

Wally

February 21, 1981

Wally Feb 2013

Kioki

February 21, 1998

Kioki

Reba

February 21, 1994

Reba Jan 2011

Logan

February 23, 1995

Logan March 2011

Tinker

February 23, 1972

Tinker migration 2009 (4)

Sandy

February 23, 1988

Sandy Feb 2013

Ariel

February 24, 1994

Ariel (7)

Luisita

February 24, 1991

Luisita

Tash

February 26, 1984Tash 150x150

Sign the Petition. Honor Their Sacrifice.

Today marks the 59th anniversary of Ham’s flight into space – let’s honor him by adding Ham and Enos into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame in 2021.

As unwilling participants in the space program, they paved the way for space exploration, yet they remain largely unrecognized.

Sign this petition to urge the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation to add Ham and Enos to the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame.

Save the Chimps honors Ham and Enos for their courage, and their unwilling sacrifice. The Space Chimps, or “Astrochimps,” hold a special place in the hearts of everyone at Save the Chimps. It was the plight of the Air Force chimps, the chimpanzees used in the early days of space research, and their descendants, that inspired our late founder Dr. Carole Noon to establish Save the Chimps.

The U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame (AHOF) opened in 1990 as a place where the accomplishments of astronauts are celebrated and showcased to the public. Located at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, visitors get a glimpse into  space flight through the world’s largest collection of personal astronaut memorabilia. Every year, AHOF honors a class of astronauts that have excelled in their accomplishments in space or in their contributions to the advancement of space exploration. Save the Chimps believes that Ham and Enos deserve to be recognized for their early advancement of space exploration, not because their use in space research is something to celebrate, but because they deserve to be honored for their sacrifices. Learn more and sign the petition

Thank you for your support!

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Meet the Lovebirds – Tootie and Lisa Marie

Find someone who loves you like Tootie loves Lisa Marie! These two lovebirds have continued to warm our hearts, since they were introduced last year, with their embraces, cuddling, grooming and most of all, their ridiculously cute and rambunctious play sessions. Just watch for yourself!

Adopt the Couple for your Valentine!

Now as a Chimpentine’s Day special, when you symbolically adopt Lisa Marie, in addition to the photo, bio, certificate, and update of Lisa Marie, we will include a photo and bio of her sweetheart, Tootie. Adopt the couple in honor of a loved one to let them know just how much you care this Valentine’s Day, all while supporting the life in sanctuary that Tootie and Lisa Marie deserve!

Make a Donation in Your Sweetheart’s Honor

Donate in honor of a special someone to let them know that you love them like Tootie loves Lisa Marie!

 

Today marks an important anniversary

“There is a light at the end of the tunnel. It is Save the Chimps. We are lighting the way for these chimps, for the migrations and for their relocation in big family groups to Florida. And Rufus and Doug and the others are lighting my way.” Save the Chimps Co-Founder, Dr. Carole Noon

Today marks an important anniversary in the history of Save the Chimps. On this day 16-years ago, the Great Chimpanzee Migration began. This unprecedented nine-year effort relocated hundreds of chimpanzees from their former laboratory in New Mexico, the Coulston Foundation, to their island homes at Save the Chimps in Florida.

A custom trailer was built, allowing us to bring ten chimpanzees at a time on the cross-country trip, each with a window allowing them to watch the sights along the way. After the 40-hour journey, our residents caught their first glimpse of the place they would call home for the rest of their lives.

Since their arrival, they have been able to live the peaceful and dignified retirement they deserve, with the freedom, companionship, and care that they need to thrive. As we watch Doc stride across his island, Rebel and Nigida grooming one another, or Rufus spend his afternoons in the sun surrounded by a loving family, we are grateful for the hard work, dedication, and support that it took to get them to exactly where they deserve to be — thank you for being part of this historic journey with us.

Sincerely,

Dr. Shelly Lakly
Executive Director